Monday Irony

A corrupt, lying, weaponized FBI thinks its bad for National Security to reveal they are corrupt, lying, and weaponized against the Nation.

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Attorney General files Deceptive Trade Practice action against Barry Somes and associated businesses

03/03/2016 02:56 PM EST

 

AUGUSTA – Attorney General Janet T. Mills announced today that she has filed an Unfair and Deceptive Trade Practices Act complaint against Barry Somes of Cumberland Center. The complaint alleges that Somes operated under numerous business names and failed to deliver on promised vacation tours after taking advanced payments and failing to provide refunds to affected consumers.

Somes operated businesses including TourBUSters, Club Impac, and Lids For Kids, among others. These businesses purported to offer motor coach tours to destinations around the Northeast United States and Canada. Somes also advertised that net profits from the tours would be donated to benefit children; the complaint alleges that that did not happen. Numerous consumers complained that after they made deposits, Somes would contact them saying that the tour had been cancelled. When the consumer requested a refund on their deposit, Somes would attempt to convince the consumer that for various reasons he could not give the refund or charge them a cancellation fee. Somes has exhibited this pattern over numerous years, prompting this action from the Attorney General to enjoin him from future similar business ventures. In the last several years the Attorney General’s Office has received 54 complaints from consumers seeking refunds of deposits paid to Somes. Of these 54, Somes has paid refunds to only 17 consumers.

“Mr. Somes took money from many elderly people who were looking forward to what might be their only vacation of the year,” said Attorney General Mills. “He pulled the rug out from under them by not only cancelling their plans, but also failing to provide timely refunds so they could make alternate arrangements. This is not how a reputable business operates. By bringing this action, we hope to discourage others from trying to do the same.”

The Attorney General is also seeking an accounting of how the consumers’ deposits were used and a disgorgement of any ill-gotten gains by Mr. Somes. Should the court find that his actions were intentional, the court could impose a $10,000 civil penalty for each violation. The civil complaint brought under Maine’s Unfair and Deceptive Trade Practices Act was filed in Kennebec County Superior Court on February 29, 2016.

The Maine Office of the Attorney General is interested in hearing from any other consumers who may have had similar dealings with Mr. Somes. They are encouraged to contact the Office of the Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Division.

Office of the Attorney General Consumer Protection Division State House Station 6 Augusta, ME 04333-0006Consumer.mediation@maine.gov Tel: 1-800-436-2131

WARNING: IRS Scams Continue to Harm Mainers

WARNING: IRS Scams Continue to Harm Mainers

Congressman Poliquin’s offices in Lewiston, Bangor and Presque Isle are here to help victims of IRS fraud

 

LEWISTON – Phone scams from IRS impersonators continue to exploit taxpayers in Maine at alarming rates. These ongoing attacks have directly harmed countless individuals in Maine’s Second District, most of which are seniors.  Congressman Bruce Poliquin’s offices in Lewiston, Bangor and Presque Isle are available as resources to anyone who has been targeted or suspects that he or she has been targeted by these scam artists.

 

“It is despicable to me that there is an entire illegal industry today that exploits so many honest, hardworking citizens,” said Congressman Poliquin.  “It is especially disturbing that these scam artists target our seniors in particular, who are more likely than anyone else to fall victim to these criminals.”

 

When answering phone calls, it is important to remember that the IRS will NEVER:

  • Call to demand immediate payment or call about taxes owed, without first having mailed you a bill.
  • Demand that you pay taxes without giving you the opportunity to question or appeal the amount they say you owe.
  • Require you to use a specific payment method for your taxes, such as a prepaid debit card.
  • Ask for credit or debit card numbers over the phone.
  • Threaten to bring in local police or other law-enforcement groups to have you arrested for not paying.

 

Also, be aware that IRS scams by email are up 400% this season.  Remember to take the proper precautions to defend against misleading and harmful emails from scammers.

 

Congressman Bruce Poliquin’s Offices:

 

  • Lewiston: 784-0768 or visit 179 Lisbon Street
  • Bangor: 942-0583 or visit 6 State Street, Suite 101
  • Presque Isle: 764-1968 or visit 631 Main Street, Suite 2

 

For additional information on how to defend against identity theft, please visit https://www.irs.gov/Individuals/Identity-Protection.

 

Congressman Poliquin has worked hard in Congress to combat scams against Mainers, especially our seniors.  In February, Poliquin introduced the Senior $afe Act in the House, which will provide important protections for seniors to combat investment fraud, an enormous abuse of the investment market that exploits about one-fifth of investors aged 65 or older.  Poliquin’s bill is companion legislation to Senator Susan Collins’ bill in the Senate.

Treasurer Hayes Warns of Fraudulent Letter and Unofficial Unclaimed Property Websites

02/26/2016 10:43 AM EST
AUGUSTA – Letters sent from a Massachusetts address, claiming to be from a prominent national unclaimed property organization, and promising to return unclaimed property from a sweepstakes prize to rightful owners, are not being sent by the Office of the State Treasurer, or the National Association of Unclaimed Property Administrators, according to Maine Treasurer Terry Hayes.

“These letters, being mailed from out of state, are not from the State Treasurer, or any reputable Unclaimed Property organization. They are fraudulent. It’s unfortunate that this entity is seeking to exploit our state’s unclaimed property program. I recommend that people who receive this notice do not respond in any way.”

“Additionally, my office has been made aware of several websites that seek to collect fees to search for properties. There is no need to pay a fee to search for, or to file a claim for property. I continue to encourage Mainers to check the state’s official Unclaimed Property List at http://www.maine.gov/upsearch and to make claims on their rightful property,” Hayes added.

Official unclaimed property notices will never direct owners to pay money, whether for processing fees, tax payments, or otherwise, when searching unclaimed property, or filing a claim. This is a very important red flag when dealing with unclaimed property. The State Treasurer’s website, http://www.maine.gov/upsearch is free of charge to search and claim, as is the national website, www.missingmoney.com.

The Office of the State Treasurer and Maine State Legislators do utilize the mail to notify owners of unclaimed property. There are a number of ways to differentiate legitimate official notices from those that are not. Notices from the Maine State Treasurer will be mailed from an Augusta, Maine return address; they will direct owners to an official State of Maine website (maine.gov); they will advertise the Treasurer’s local phone number (207) 624-7470, and they will bear the official seal of the State of Maine and the signature of the Treasurer.

Unclaimed Property consists of cash and other financial assets that are considered lost or abandoned when an owner cannot be located after a specified period of time. It includes, among other items, checking accounts, certificates of deposit, over payments, gift certificates, life insurance policies, unpaid wages, uncashed checks, death benefits, dividends, insurance payments, refunds, savings accounts, stocks and contents of safe deposit boxes. Unclaimed Property does not include real estate, animals or vehicles. The Office of the Maine State Treasurer is currently holding $225,000,000 worth of property that belongs to Mainers.