Monday Irony (Double Shot)

The Maine legislature defines transparency by banning cameras in the legislature and refusing to post the roll call of the votes.

A Red Flag on Red Flag

 

A reasonable request is the wrapping that always gleams around the package of anti-gun legislation. A temptation for the modern Pandora to unwrap in a quest to prove a worthy proponent of reasonable acquiescence. In the pattern of the wrapping’s past lies the folly of lifting that fabled lid.

The aftermath of tragedy usually finds “we-must-do-something” politicians careening about with all the precision of a pinball machine directing the Nation to pay little heed that laws were not enforced, but instead, add one more. In the case of Red Flag gun laws, government is endeavoring to do what it has utterly failed to do in the past; solve a problem. Trying to solve one problem usually finds the government inventing a whole list of new ones.

Red Flag laws vary in their form but are all packaged as a way to keep guns away from those who may give evidence, show a tendency, give that icky feeling, or in rare versions been accused of domestic violence. Remember, fifty states have civil commitment procedures already in place. Still, there are a couple of reasons to raise a red flag on Red Flag laws.

Domestic situations are of the most complicated and confusing that law enforcement have to deal with. To take a citizen’s weapons away based upon accusation without conviction encourages revenge attacks so prevalent in these domestic tangled webs. The criteria for a “Red Flag” accusation tends to be too broad in most of these legislation lending credence to the suspicion of a “Trojan” motive.

This is the fundamental reason for opposing these laws, the end game. Anti-gun legislation always has the ultimate goal of gun confiscation. This pattern is forever consistent with government and no reasonable citizen should open the door to that.